Sigmund Freud's Office

Recently I watched the film “A Dangerous Method,” in which Michael Fassbender portrays Carl Jung opposite Viggo Mortensen’s Sigmund Freud. There are extensive scenes set in Freud’s office, which is lined with books, modern art, and packed with figurines from all the cultures of the world. I have a number of what were once called “primitive” art pieces scattered about my apartment, and I was quite envious of Freud’s collection. Here’s another rendition of Freud’s Vienna office, from the stage…

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Scot Meacham Wood Launches Vintage Barware Collection

Colleague and pal Scot Meecham Wood continues to expand his tartan-trimmed empire with a new website for his design services as well as a growing variety of wares in his home collection. These wares include a wide selection of vintage barware for all your imbibing needs. Here are a few equestrian-themed samples to whet your whistle, and you can head over here to check it all out.    

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Boutet De Monvel Auction At Sotheby's

Ah, April in Paris. That’s where you’ll want to be in a couple of months when Sotheby’s auctions off a major collection of the works of the elegant Boutet de Monvel. The collection was preserved by his descendants in his own studio. Monvel died in 1949. Check out Sotheby’s wonderful video here.

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The Three-Button, Bow-Tied Armoire Bar

Last week I attended the Architectural Digest home and design show here in New York. It was a bit disappointing, so I’m just going to run one photo of this rather clever creation by a couple of young furniture makers on Long Island. Inspired by an armoire, it’s a bar with three knobs in the place of buttons. And look, it’s undarted. Price was $25,000.  

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English Gentlemen At Home

This is a post inspired by a post inspired by another post. By which I mean I saw these photos at Die Workwear!, which had been inspired by a similar one at No Man Walks Alone. But whereas Die Workwear! focused on the sartorial aspects of shots British photographer Allen Warren did in the 1980s, here we turn our attention to the trappings of the gentlemen’s stately homes.  

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